Home » Routes to Desert Watering Places in the Salton Sea Region, California by John S Brown
Routes to Desert Watering Places in the Salton Sea Region, California John S Brown

Routes to Desert Watering Places in the Salton Sea Region, California

John S Brown

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781332192021
Paperback
118 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Excerpt from Routes to Desert Watering Places in the Salton Sea Region, CaliforniaThe desert region of the United States forms a great triangle whose base, 800 miles long, is the Mexican border from the Peninsular Mountains, in southern California,MoreExcerpt from Routes to Desert Watering Places in the Salton Sea Region, CaliforniaThe desert region of the United States forms a great triangle whose base, 800 miles long, is the Mexican border from the Peninsular Mountains, in southern California, to the mouth of Pecos River, in Texas, and whose apex is in north-central Oregon. The west side of this huge desert triangle is the mountain wall formed by the Peninsular Mountains, the Sierra Nevada, and the Cascade Range- the east or northeast side is a less definite line extending from north-central Oregon through Salt Lake City and Santa Fe to the mouth of Pecos River. (See P1. I.) It covers about 500,000 square miles, or very nearly one-sixth of the area of the United States.This region is by no means devoid of natural resources or human activity. It contains prosperous cities, fertile agricultural districts, forest-clad mountains, a large aggregate number of watering places, many rich mines, and an unknown wealth of mineral deposits. But the localities that have water supplies are widely separated oases in a vast expanse of silent, changeless, unproductive desert, whose most impressive feature is its great distances and whose chief evidences of human occupation are the long, long roads that lead from one watering place to another.In the future existing oases will be enlarged, many new ones will be created, and the mineral and agricultural product of the region will be greatly increased. But in spite of all that man can do this large region will remain essentially a desert.Travelers in this region must depend for their existence on the desert water holes (springs, wells, or natural tanks), many of which are separated from one another by a hard days journey with team and wagon. For most of the region the water holes have never been accurately mapped or described, no systematic provision has been made for maintaining them, and the roads leading to them have not been marked with substantial and reliable signs. Hence travel in the remote parts of the region has been a precarious and sometimes a dangerous undertaking.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.